11/30/2006

Transfiguration Moment...

Still mesmerized by the beauty, decay and opportunity that Transfiguration Church is beginning to represent. More to follow.

photo courtesy of Sean Galbraith, Toronto.
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6 comments:

Anonymous said...

sad to think that it is raining inside there tonight...

Mlystad said...

the truely sad thing it is that owner(the super coward local local lawyer Trezevant) is most likely waiting for a demolition order so that 'salvageable' items can be removed from this Polish master piece. remember that the preservation board/city laws and policy prohibits removing such items. what a dirt bag. i hope his mom is sentence to hard time.

Mlystad said...

i admit I was harsh, but people like the 'owner' of Transfiguration are the reason that Buffalo buildings decline. The worst thing is he'll never pay or be held accountable and most likely make a profit from his deteriorating properties without spending a dime beyond the initial acquisition price(aka pennies on the dollar)

Chris Hawley said...

Wow, Dave, that's really amazing. Once Monday is done, I definitely want to head over there!

Mark Williams said...

I really need to make a point of viewing this church the next time I am in Western New York.

I just read the “brief history” section of this website and am amazed that the building has only been closed since 1993. Admittedly, thirteen-years is a long time, but certainly not long enough to have caused this much deterioration shown in these photographs. I would surmise that the building had received no form of maintenance for many years while still being used as a Roman Catholic Church.

The real tragedy is that once the roofing system of any building has been compromised, it pretty much dictates the end of the building.

The current owner, Trezevant, should be cited for building code infractions and/or not securing a potentially dangerous situation where, I assume, anyone can gain access to the building.

The concept of partial demolition is unique but it is still a sad fact that a once, wonderfully designed building was abandoned and left to decay.

Curious though; has the school and rectory suffered from the same fate?

Anonymous said...

Mark -

The other buildings - school, convent, and rectory - are still in use, and in decent (though not stellar) shape. I believe they were all purchased by Muslims, as was the former Polish National Cathedral a couple blocks away on Sobieski, and the former Queen of the Most Holy Rosary Church a couple blocks down Sycamore.

The priests had given up on the building long before 1993, though when I was in it around 1990 it still looked fine. There wasn't much fuss over Bishop Head's decision to close the place - of the 4 Polish churches closed that year, the only real battle was over St. Luke's, where the parishioners fought to stay open but the bishop wouldn't budge.