7/12/2007

Double Wide...

While heading to the bank this afternoon, spotted this on Broadway...
IMG_9059-1
Anyone know if pre-fab houses meet local building codes?
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6 comments:

MJ said...

Prefabs cab be pretty cool. I've seen a couple go up in cheektowaga. One is two stories with an in-law set up that came in as 4 sections (two downstairs, two upstairs) The roof and attached garage were then added. It went up very quick and I was inpressed. You can;t tell the difference from the other houses around it.

Also when I go down to Scranton to visit my friend, there are what I would call "house dealerships" along the main highway that have all these models of huge houses right there. I am rather impressed, for new builds, how nice they are, their pricing, and that they are all prefabbed before final assembly on site.

Anonymous said...

OH MY GOD!!!!! It has VINYL SIDING!

STEEL said...

That should fit in well with the newly forming rural landscape on the east side

Sharon Centanne said...

If this type of housing is legal for local building codes, it is time to change the building codes! This type of instant housing looks like instant ghetto to me. In 10 years, these places will look like junk. Restore the sturdy old homes built by our ancestors instead!
Sharon Centanne

Anonymous said...

Strange that it would cut through downtown heading towards City Hall? Maybe a construction trailor for City Tower? HAHAHAHA

George Thomas Apfel said...

There is a difference between the home pictured above, commonly called a "manufactured" home, and "modular" or "prebuilt" homes. According to the 1976 HUD specifications, a home built on a metal frame with wheels as pictured above is the present-day incarnation of a mobile home, currently called a manufactured home. They are towed to the site in one, two, or three sections. Modular homes, on the other hand, are built in sections or modules in a factory to local building codes and trucked to the site on flatbed trucks. Once assembled on site they become permanent strctures with multi-story configurations and appear just like stick-built homes...but are stronger since they are built to withstand the stresses of moving.