6/02/2007

Queen City Farm - film...

queencitymasthead.jpg
Here's the short film from John Paget about Queen City Farm featuring Aaron Bartley, Sheila Bass, Diane Picard, Samina Raja, Erin Sharkey, Tim Tielman, Cynthia Van Ness and more.
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11 comments:

Celia said...

What a fantastic document. Thank you.

STEEL said...

very well done

Sharon Centanne said...

Awesome! What a wonderful way to market preservation and re-use for the urban environment. I plan on telling my local preservation group about your film. Is the code available to posting on MySpace?

Sharon Centanne
St. Petersburg, FL

Anonymous said...

It is inspiring to see all these intelligent committed folks creatively addressing inner-city blight in Bflo.

My only concern is that there is a desperate need for more informed citizens to watch the $10's of millions of "poverty funds" flowing thru City Hall, primarily from HUD, which too often make things worse.

If those funds could be creatively & cost-effectively reformed, dramatic improvements could occur.

Dick Kern

fix buffalo said...

Sharon...

Follow this link. It takes you to the google video site. There you'll find the links you need to embed in myspace, blogger etc...

Celia, Steel & Dick...

Thanks for the support...see what you can do to help get the word out to a larger audience...

Chris H said...

There is no more proof you need, David, to demonstrate the "trickle up" effect of your blog. Bravo for revealing a tremendous opportunity which is now unfolding in the revitalization of the Engel House and the establishment of an income-producing, environmentally friendly East Side farming project!

Michele J said...

Thinking outside of the box! i love it!

Jefferson said...

Excellent film. Both disturbing and uplifting. Looks like there's a school across the street. Good luck Queen City Farm.

Rich R said...

I'm a 4th generation Buffalonian who has moved away...sad but true. I recently visited and drove through some of these neighborhoods, many on the East Side. I was in shock. I'm a business man, and I'm astonished to see the amount of assets that are going to waste due to the many nefarious business practices perpetrated by predatory lending, and many other similar financial tactics. The result is horrific! These houses that lie in waste, I could almost hear them crying for the children and families that once played in their yards and rooms. I really almost cried.

I stumbled on this video as I was Googling an old high school friend. It is such an inspiration to see this kind of thought, and most importantly action, going on in Buffalo. I have always said that the downtown areas are raw gems that just need a plan for renovation that will be self sustaining. That is the key...Sustainable Economic Growth... not just a short term fix.

One suggestion that I would make, if this farm gets up and running... make a deal with local organic restaurants to supply them with locally grown foods. This could blossom into a urban farming business with a long lifespan. Buffalo has always responded to local business initiatives, and this is one of the best ideas I've heard in a long time.

Best of luck... I will check up on this project to see if a Buffalonian exile can be of assistance.

P.S. my great grandfather, grandfather, aunts and uncles were all in the local fruit and vegetable business at all levels. They had a stand at the Old Broadway market, as well as being one of the founders of the Niagara Frontier Food Terminal, which is still there and has stands available.

They were poor homeless imigrants when they arrived...but Buffalo offered them a way to live and raise their families, and the hope of something better for future generations. I think you are continuing that tradition...I know their spirits are smiling on you.

Anonymous said...

I am a planning student and so I tend to the practical.

WONDERFUL IDEAS, BUT:
How funded? How many will work there? Is it intended to be financially independent and self-sustaining? If so, how? With what crops? Marketed how? How will the AMOUNT of produce(if its produce) compare to the dietary needs of the local neighborhood?

Thanks for your time,
Jack

p.s. I have just begun research on this, and so if anyone else knows of other projects that answer these questions, please let me know, THANKS!

Anonymous said...

We are a couple from California, we purchased a house near allentown. We plan on making the move to Buffalo. This short film inspired us to make this transplant sooner than later. Organic "yes"