10/02/2007

Three Years Later...

Things are always changing...

When I started this little neighborhood blog three years ago - October 2004 - I could not have imagined the response, reaction and readership that I've received. I've met some amazing and totally tuned in people that i could have only met here because of this little neighborhood blog. Yet, I'm continuously reminded of the need for a sustained critique of this place. Sure it's raw, very quiet and increasingly more vacant and as at one new fixBuffalo fan has commented - Buffalo resembles New York City in the 70's more than any other place they've been.

Significant development here in this neighborhood on the City's near East side - including the Merriweather Library, Artspace and the new Arts Academy - since I started blogging, which is all really amazing. Yet the persistant wholesale hollowing out of the neighborhoods, backed up by recent Postal Service data referencing trends in undeliverable addresses is not getting the attention in the local 'sphere or print media. Wrote about it - Undeliverable, "No One Home" - in May. Just heard from another fixBuffalo reader that only NO one from the City of Buffalo - the people that need this the most - attended the recent ReClaiming Conference sponsored by the National Vacant Properties Campaign, last week in Pittsburgh. Heavily attended by folks from other cities.

After three years, I've decided to take a break from the regular and resource rich posting that many of my readers have come to expect. I'll probably sneak in few posts as there are some significant new developments with Transfiguration Church and over on Coe Place and will keep tabs on the Woodlawn Row House which were just sold at auction, too.

I'll be back soon, I'm sure with a slightly different take on what's still (not) happening here in Buffalo. This may include some extended work on a variety of macro issues - Buffalo as decentralized back-office and a critical (re) examination and role of the Albright-Knox in developing Buffalo as part of the expanding global art scene. Buffalo as exurb for expanding population of the Niagara Peninsula and Toronto as well as pied-a-tier for New York crowd all augurs well for the future here and represent a few of the strategic advantages that may push the agenda forward. You can interviews and podcasts that intersect the artistic, cultural and political agenda of the people who desire to make Buffalo home - for four days or forever.

In the meantime, if you haven't scoped Writing the City, check it out. I've been collecting links to various critiques of Buffalo. Got to read what Soundlab's Craig Reynolds has been saying for like forever and Bernard-Henri Lévy and Diana Dillaway, too. If you've been stopping by here on occasion or more frequently you should know what these people are saying...
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ArtspaceBAVPATour d'Neglect - 2007Woodlawn Row Housesfaqmy flickr
the creativity exchangeCEOs for Cities

9 comments:

b said...

Thanks for your work on this. Hope you enjoy your break and return as planned. While I haven’t always completely agreed with your takes, your stream of content is always provoking, informative, and very well presented. I’ve learned a lot from it.

Keith said...

So you are finally starting your run for Mayor!? Good.

George Thomas Apfel said...

David, I'll miss your regular contributions but you deserve the break. You've done a great job championing the cause of fixing what's wrong in our city; you're an inspiration to me to do the same.

RaChaCha said...

David:
Your blog has been consistently great, and an inspiration. I've told folks here in RaChaCha how various blogs and bloggers are playing a major role in Buffalo's revitalization - and yours is one of the set I recommend checking out.

Your focus has been on a part of town that has needed (and benefited from)this kind of focus - an area on the edge in many ways, with major challenges yet exciting possibilities. Your perspective and tone are right on the mark. You have frequently shone the light where it needed to be shone, and taken a stick to many who have sorely deserved it.

BTW, your mention that NO ONE from Buffalo city hall attended the recent vacant properties conference is something all Buffalonians should find sad and troubling, given the magnitude of Buffalo's problem. My fair city had a dozen attendees at the conference (I nearly attended myself), half of whom were from city hall.

Best regards for you work, and best wishes for all that comes next.

Anonymous said...

Good luck. Hope you'll continue to fill us in on updates on the many residential properties that you've featured (as well as Transfiguration and the Orphanage).

BuffaloRox

Ryan Horton said...

Thank you for all the great content over the years. It's been a true pleasure. My great city of Milwaukee could learn a few things from your activism.

Anonymous said...

Your blog has always been great in informing readers about the present state of many of the decaying homes in the City of Buffalo.

Has anyone noticed "160 & 164 Brunswick" which our both city owned vacant homes? Is there a plan to rehab these units?

Anonymous said...

Hurry back, we'll be waiting for ya.

Eisenbart

Will Hoffmann said...

This has become one of my favorite websites in the past year.

We need more people in this city who want to see the East Side rise up.